educate */*/

educate */*/
UK [ˈedjʊkeɪt] / US [ˈedʒəˌkeɪt] verb
Word forms "educate":
present tense I/you/we/they educate he/she/it educates present participle educating past tense educated past participle educated
Collocations:
Someone who teaches students about particular subjects, usually in a school or university, educates them: He was educated at a school in Paris. The government spends more on weapons than on educating its children. Someone who looks after their children until the children are adults and who teaches them about life brings them up: I was brought up in the city. My parents brought me up to always tell the truth.
a) [transitive, often passive] to teach someone, usually for several years, especially at a school, college, or university
educate someone at something:

He was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge.

More and more parents are choosing to educate their children at home.

educate someone in something:

Children were educated in both arts and sciences.

b) [intransitive/transitive] to give someone necessary or useful knowledge

The BBC's mission is to inform, educate, and entertain.

educate someone about something:

The mining museum was built to educate people about their local history.

educate someone to do something:

Our job is to educate young people to think about the environment.


English dictionary. 2014.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Educate~ — is The Journal of Doctoral Research in Education, published by the Doctoral School at the Institute of Education, University of London. Educate was first published in 2001 in paper form as Educate The London Journal of Doctoral Research in… …   Wikipedia

  • educate — ed u*cate ([e^]d [ u]*k[=a]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Educated} ([e^]d [ u]*k[=a] t[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Educating} ([e^]d [ u]*k[=a] t[i^]ng).] [L. educatus, p. p. of educare to bring up a child physically or mentally, to educate, fr. educere… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • educate — (v.) mid 15c., bring up (children), train, from L. educatus, pp. of educare bring up, rear, educate, which is related to educere bring out, lead forth, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + ducere to lead (see DUKE (Cf. duke) (n …   Etymology dictionary

  • educate — I verb brief, bring up, civilize, coach, cultivate, direct, discipline, drill, edify, educare, enlighten, erudire, explain, familiarize, give lessons, guide, implant, inculcate, indoctrinate, inform, initiate, instituere, instruct, interpret,… …   Law dictionary

  • educate — train, discipline, school, *teach, instruct …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • educate — [v] teach information, experience brainwash*, brief, civilize, coach, cultivate, develop, discipline, drill, drum into, edify, enlighten, exercise, explain, foster, improve, indoctrinate, inform, instruct, let in on, mature, nurture, put hip*,… …   New thesaurus

  • educate — ► VERB 1) give intellectual, moral, and social instruction to. 2) give training in or information on a particular subject. DERIVATIVES educable adjective educative adjective educator noun. ORIGIN Latin educare lead out …   English terms dictionary

  • educate — [ej′o͞o kāt΄, ej′əkāt΄] vt. educated, educating [ME educaten < L educatus, pp. of educare, to bring up, rear, or train < educere < e , out + ducere, to lead: see DUCT] 1. to train or develop the knowledge, skill, mind, or character of,… …   English World dictionary

  • educate — ed|u|cate [ edʒə,keıt ] verb ** transitive often passive to teach someone, usually for several years, especially at a school, college, or university: She was educated at Smith College and Yale Law School. More and more parents are choosing to… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • educate — verb ( cated; cating) Etymology: Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth more at educe Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to provide schooling for < chose to… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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